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I Would Prefer Not To: Writing About Resistance with Eraldo Souza dos Santos

$65.00 · May 30

We’ll explore genres such as the autobiographical essay, the declaration, the manifesto, and the revolutionary poem—special attention will be paid to the uses of the first person and the roles of the narrator in accounts of resistance.

Start Date

May 30

Day(s) of the Week

Thursday

Class Times

6:30pm – 8:30pm CT

Sessions

1

Location

Zoom (online)

Instructor

Price

$65

In stock

Description

In his essay “Resist, Refuse” (2018), Teju Cole argues that the word “resistance,” once holy, has now become unexceptional. “Faced with a vulgar, manic and cruel regime,” he argues, “birds of many different feathers are eager to proclaim themselves members of the Resistance.” Do we, in fact, use the word “resistance” too much and in inappropriate ways? If so, what forms of action or refusal can be properly characterized as resistance? More crucially, what is resistance and what does resisting entail?

Cole’s provocation will be our starting point in this writing workshop. We’ll be reading and discussing selected writings from authors such as Angela Davis, Julián Fuks, Ilya Kaminsky, Han Kang, and the Combahee River Collective. By combining readings and writing prompts, we’ll also explore genres such as the autobiographical essay, the declaration, the manifesto, and the revolutionary poem. Over the course of the workshop, special attention will be paid to the uses of the first person and the roles of the narrator in accounts of resistance. Participants will have the opportunity to workshop their pieces at the end of the workshop and during a one-on-one meetings with the instructor.

About Eraldo Souza dos Santos

A 2022 LARB Publishing Fellow, Eraldo Souza dos Santos is a Brazilian writer currently based between Paris and São Paulo. He will join Cornell University as a Klarman Fellow this summer and UC Irvine as an Assistant Professor within the Poetic Justice Cluster in Summer 2025. His first book, to be published in 2025, is an autobiography of his illiterate mother and a meditation on the lived experience of Blackness and enslavement in modern Brazil. At the age of seven, his mother was sold into slavery by her white foster sister. It was 1968—eighty years after the abolition of slavery in Brazil and four years into the anti-communist coup d’état, during the month in which the military overruled the Constitution by decree. By weaving in extensive archival research and interviews, the novel narrates their journey to Minas Gerais—where she was born—and Bahia—the Blackest state in Brazil, where she was enslaved on a farm for three years—to investigate why the family that enslaved her has never been brought to justice. It also narrates his grandmother’s journey to search for her missing daughter. In March 2023, he offered this masterclass at the prestigious UEA Creative Writing Course. You can keep up with Eraldo on Twitter at @esdsantos.